Mercy Center

FOUR SEASONS HAIKU KAI

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HAIKU KAI REPORT
JULY 26, 2014
SUMMER MEETING

 

Attending

Anne Rees Anderson, Jane Benson, Barbara Campitelli, Mary Fuchs, David Keim, Elaine Mannon, Sarah Paris, Janet Schroder and Mark Werlin

New participant Elaine Mannon enlivened the meeting with open-minded questions about haiku form. It was an opportunity to revisit some of the foundational elements of haiku—and our own writing practice—that we often take for granted. Do we compose to the 5-7-5 or 2-3-2 forms, and how rigid are those constraints? A fragment in the first line, the second and third lines flowing together and casting the first line in a new light? Asking these and other questions generated focus as we read and edited our new haiku.

Mark gave a short presentation on punctuation use in haiku, drawn from articles by poets Donna Ferrell and Jane Reichhold. This proved a rich area for discussion, and Jane Benson will lead a simple exercise based on punctuation at the next meeting. David Keim brought along recent original artwork, some of which will be included in the new haiku collection. At the Fall meeting, we will also review proofs of the new collection and discuss distribution. If there is time and interest, we may want to discuss planning a new workshop for 2015.

 

Upcoming Meetings

Fall: October 25 (theme - Migration and Flight) | Winter: January 24, 2015

Some of the haiku shared at the July meeting:

 

Summer wind
in the cork willow tree
whispers and shadows
Anne Rees Anderson
   
at first light
a barge of grain
plowing the river
Jane Benson
   
eating dinner
the shadow of evening
joins me
Barbara Campitelli
   
steamy night
shadows in the garden
Standing still
Mary Fuchs
   
mid-morning sun
behind the clouds—
moon sized wafer
David Keim
   
Dew drenched air
Bees buzzing in lavender
Breathing in the morning
Elaine Mannon
   
The sun resting
on flagstones
a monarch butterfly
Sarah Paris
   
grey blanket
tucking in the city—
evening fog
Janet Schroder
   
hidden in shadow;
a black cat and a
half-forgotten rake
Mark Werlin