Mercy Center

MONTHLY ART EXHIBIT

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An Expression of the Spirit

 

Every two months, we host a new exhibit of artworks: original drawings, paintings and photographs created by friends and associates of Mercy Center Burlingame. The art gallery space is located on the 2nd floor in the hallway between the main stairway and the Oak Room. If you're attending a retreat or program, we encourage you to visit the gallery, enjoy a cup of coffee or tea, and take a few moments to experience the world through the eyes of artists.

Mercy Center Gallery is open every day from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

 

Current Exhibit

 

Margot Campbell Gross at Mercy Center

Acrylic works by Margot Campbell Gross are exhibited in a show titled "For the Time Being" at the Mercy Center Art Gallery from July 1 to August 31.

Margot grew up in England and early discovered her love for art. She attended the Academie Julien in Paris and the Royal College of Art in London. At the Beckingham Art School in Kent, England, she trained and practiced as a furniture designer. Designing furniture gave Margot an understanding and appreciation of structure which continues to influence her painting. Margot continued to study painting after moving to the United States where she and her husband Peter raised their six children.

She was ordained to the Unitarian Universalist Ministry, and served congregations in New Jersey and California, painting whenever she could. In 2004, Margot retired as minister of the First Unitarian Universalist Society of San Francisco, allowing her to spend more time working in her studio. She has exhibited her work in Balboa Park, San Diego; at the First Unitarian Universalist Church in San Francisco; and in the King Gallery in San Francisco.

 

Artist's Statement

The subject of these new paintings, as of my previous work, is the human aspiration to grow by reaching out beyond oneself, and by reaching within. I approach painting as a spiritual exploration, which includes problem solving, intuitive response, and reflection.

In many of these paintings, this theme is expressed by the spiral or coil, although that figure may be almost obliterated in the painting process. This spiral/coil signifies not merely the shape of growth-spiraling outward and coiling inward-but also the energy that fuels the will to grow.

Painting, for me, is a dialogue with the Unknown.

For more information, visit Margot Campbell Art.

 

Painting by Margaret Campbell Gross

 

"Red Earth" by Margaret Campbell Gross